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Selma: The Bridge to the Ballot: Documentary Film Showing

Selma: The Bridge to the Ballot

The History Department and FLITE present a free showing of the documentary,
Selma: The Bridge to the Ballot
Tuesday, October 4, 2016 at 7:00 PM in BUS 111

Anyone with a disability that needs special accommodations to attend this event should contact (231) 591-2758 at least 72 hours in advance.

Image from National Voting Rights Museum and Institute

Links

Teaching Tolerance
The anti-bias education project of the Southern Poverty Law Center, "Teaching Tolerance . . . combats prejudice among our nation’s youth while promoting equality, inclusiveness and equitable learning environments in the classroom."

National Voting Rights Museum and Institute
From the Mission Statement: ". . . Therefore, our mission is to be a Museum and Institute that chronicles and preserves the historic journey for the right to vote that began when the “Founding Fathers” first planted the seeds of democracy in 1776.  As such, the struggle for justice and democracy is a never-ending one.  Each generation will have its barriers to overcome and its stories to share.  The Museum is committed to collecting and sharing these stories, struggles, and victories for generations to come."

Selma to Montgomery: 50 Years Later
A commemorative page from WhiteHouse.gov, this resource also contains links to audio files containing oral histories of participants in the marches.

Selma: The Bridge to the Ballot

Selma: The Bridge to the Ballot
Tuesday, October 4, 2016 at 7:00 pm in BUS 111

Produced by Teaching Tolerance, a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center, the "film tells the story of a courageous group of students and teachers who, along with other activists, fought a nonviolent battle to win voting rights for African Americans in the South. Standing in their way: a century of Jim Crow, a resistant and segregationist state, and a federal government slow to fully embrace equality. By organizing and marching bravely in the face of intimidation, violence, arrest and even murder, these change-makers achieved one of the most significant victories of the civil rights era."